Home > Desktop User > Why Newbies Should Choose Ubuntu

Why Newbies Should Choose Ubuntu

The first question I hear Linux newbies ask is what is the best distribution to use? I think right now plenty of linux desktop options exist for newbies however a few things set Ubuntu ahead of the pack in my opinion.

Support

Although exact figures are nearly impossible to gather, Ubuntu has been estimated to have over 10 million users and is by far the most popular Linux distribution. This makes getting help easier because places like the UbuntuForums and IRC-client are full of people that can answer any question a newbie throws at them. In addition to free support an increasing number of Ubuntu book, training CD, and training course options can be seen everywhere.

Future

Ubuntu has a great team of people on board that have sacrificed a lot to get it to where it is now. Ubuntu has been built in an organized manner with a planned release every six months. Scheduled releases bring routine enhancements and new features to the operating system. In most cases I’ve found Ubuntu versions can be upgraded from within without any re-installation.

Flavors
What other distribution do you know that has been developed in multiple flavors the way Ubuntu has? Having Kubuntu, as good as it is, around is excellent as many people use Kubuntu that would never use Ubuntu. Having Xubuntu and Ubuntu Studio release at the same time and all carry their own distinct assets just increases the user base of Ubuntu that much more.

I’ve listed only a few of the advantages to using Ubuntu. What are your personal reasons for using Ubuntu over the next guy?

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  1. October 6, 2009 at 7:10 am

    Personally I would rather advise a newbie to try Linux Mint. Since it is a derivative of Ubuntu it gives you many of the advantages of it’s big brother, but dresses it in an GUI that is probably easier for people used to Windows.

  2. nospam
    October 6, 2009 at 7:27 am

    Ubuntu is an excellent distro (if not the best) and the community is very friendly. You have the free spirit and the accessibility, thanks to Mark Shuttleworth.

    Novell with OpenSUSE (the second choice for beginners) is all the opposite. OpenSUSE is a Windows like for Linux. KDE is bloated and plain ugly by definition, in the same way a M$ OS is. No wonder why Novell pushes the users to install it over Gnome. If you add the Novell branding, you get the big picture.

    Novell intent is to destroy the Linux community by imposing their standards (the bloody C sharp MONO among other things, as to replace GIMP) and their monopoly, in the exact same way Microsoft did.

    People moving from W$ to Linux are usually looking for a change. They are feed up with the marketing M$ and Apple bullshit and the bloat. They are perfect guests for Ubuntu.

    Once again Novell is targeting the opposite, they are expecting M$ users to move form a M$ platform to theirs, but still feeling home. For this purpose, Novell will server them as much bloat as they were used to on Win$.

    Do yourself a favor: BOYCOTT MICROSOFT-NOVELL and support Ubuntu.

  3. glyj
    October 6, 2009 at 10:17 am

    There are many distributions for new users.
    I suggest you to try Mandriva.
    The great advantage of Mandriva is the Control center.
    You can configure almost everything you need in a GUI.
    Once you are more used to your new system, you can expand the control center with the drakwizards (to install & configure in a few clicks things like servers: ftp, web, openssh, dns …etc.)

    regards,
    glyj

    PS: http://wiki.mandriva.com/

  4. ch
    October 6, 2009 at 4:09 pm

    Mint > Ubuntu

  5. October 6, 2009 at 4:57 pm

    Nothing can beat Debian+KDE ^_^

  6. Magice
    October 7, 2009 at 7:23 am

    If reasons to choose Ubuntu includes stuffs like popularity, ease of getting support, and large user base, well, tell you what, just recommend Windows. See, it is popular, easy to get support (just call, Microsoft representatives will take good care of you), and have enormous user base.

    I mean, seriously, guys, I can set up a Windows box such that it is extremely difficult to attack (using full suite of tools, including antivirus, spy/adware sweeper, firewall, etc.), and recommend a fast enough machine, which is quite cheap these days. It is not impossible. In such case, the users will obviously harvest all goodnesses of Ubuntu, without the hassle of switching over to Ubuntu, right?

    The thing that I am most irritated about this kind of “recommendation” is that it allows no upward ladder. Users are to remain users, as stupid and ignorant as possible, as hopeless and vulnerable to the whim of the developers as possible, as dependent on the supporting company (how is canonical different from Microsoft, seriously? Does it contribute back to Linux? GNU? No) as possible. Why, why can’t we recommend something that, instead of dumping down, empowers its users? Something that enlightens its users with their potentials, educates them about the risks associated with proprietary and/or closed-source software, and allows them a way to be come more computer literate. Stop the stupid argument about “such and such people don’t care.” In many countries, people spend on average 4+ hours in front of the TV, which degrades their health, damages their minds, and spreads stereotype. Why can’t we try to help them escape their boring lives? Why can’t we treat them as equal, not as n00bs or stupid users or what not?

    Why?

  7. October 7, 2009 at 2:28 pm

    Why Ubuntu and not Windows? Because freedom is important, even for the beginner.

    About setting up Windows: How secure is your Windows server?

    About treating newbies differently: These “Ubuntu noobs” are future server users, don’t kid yourself.

  8. Ari Torhamo
    October 7, 2009 at 8:50 pm

    If reasons to choose Ubuntu includes stuffs like popularity, ease of getting support, and large user base, well, tell you what, just recommend Windows.

    Perhaps you should read the article more carefully. The question was “what is the best distribution to use?”, not “what is the best operating system to use?”. The writer obviously left out things that are common to most GNU/Linux distributions.

    I mean, seriously, guys, I can set up a Windows box such that it is extremely difficult to attack (using full suite of tools, including antivirus, spy/adware sweeper, firewall, etc.), and recommend a fast enough machine, which is quite cheap these days. It is not impossible.

    Well, with Ubuntu it’s easy: just install Ubuntu and it’s extremely difficult to attack.

    how is canonical different from Microsoft, seriously?

    I’m afraid this kind of comments won’t help people to take you seriously.

    Why, why can’t we recommend something that, instead of dumping down, empowers its users?

    What can you do with your favourite distribution (which you don’t reveal) that you can’t do with Ubuntu?

    In many countries, people spend on average 4+ hours in front of the TV, which degrades their health, damages their minds, and spreads stereotype. Why can’t we try to help them escape their boring lives? Why can’t we treat them as equal, not as n00bs or stupid users or what not?

    I very much agree that people should take better care of their health, but I don’t see how sitting in front of a computer instead of a TV set or choosing another GNU/Linux distribution than Ubuntu helps with that.

  9. October 8, 2009 at 3:21 am

    Thanks

  10. October 28, 2009 at 9:35 am

    Ubuntu is very user friendly.

  11. bomogolfer
    January 6, 2010 at 6:04 pm

    Hi,

    I have been considering trying linux for longer than I care to remember. Is trying to set up a dual boot with vista too much hassle for a computer user of average technical ability? If not, any particular guides recommended? Particularly that describe how to get wireless working etc. Appreciate some advice, thanks

  12. January 6, 2010 at 6:07 pm

    It really depends on the hardware your using as far as wireless compatibility. Here’s a few tutorials on our site including a good one on wireless http://beginlinux.com/desktop_training/ubuntu. Also post in our forum and we’ll walk you through the process.

  13. bomogolfer
    January 8, 2010 at 4:58 pm

    Hi Beginlinux,

    thanks for your reply. Have downloaded ubuntu and it looks good. Just one problem, I am trying to get connected to the internet but no luck. I am connecting via wireless/dsl. My windows connection works fine but not after using ubuntu. When I switch back to windows (vista) my network adaptor disappears. I have corrected that. When attempting to connect through ubuntu I am being asked for my wep password which I enter but it does not connect. Any ideas why not when it’s the same password with windows?

    ps I have read a few posts on connecting but they do get a bit too technical.

  1. October 6, 2009 at 3:28 pm

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